Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB)

This article originally appeared in Cannabis Business Executive and is republished here with permission.

The rapid evolution of the cannabis industry in the United States poses many unique questions, the most interesting of which is what cannabis regulation will look like under federal legalization. Although (legal) cannabis is a brand new industry, it is not

As we previously reported, Executive Order 14036 (E.O. 14036) required the Treasury secretary, who oversees the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB), to issue a report to the White House Competition Council (the Council) chair, assessing the current market structure and conditions of competition in the U.S. alcohol market.

In response to

On December 3, the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) issued a proposed rulemaking aimed at modernizing and streamlining permit application and reporting requirements for distilled spirits plants (DSPs), wineries, importers, wholesalers, alcohol beverage dealers, and other permittees. TTB’s proposed changes are good for the industry because they will reduce the regulatory burden

We recently posted that the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued warnings to a large number of companies in various industries about “unfair” or “deceptive” trade practices related to third-party endorsements. Some of the businesses that received those warnings included alcoholic beverage companies. FTC’s warnings raise the broader question of what is acceptable when it comes

The alcoholic beverage industry is known for its ability to create new, innovative beverages that do not always fit neatly into the traditional categories of beer, wine, and spirits. Hard seltzer is one example of a new, innovative beverage that has gained significant popularity in recent years. From a regulatory compliance perspective, it is challenging