Photo of Abbey Thornhill

Abbey is an associate in the firm’s White Collar and Government Investigations group. She is a recent graduate of the University of Virginia School of Law, where she served on the editorial board for the Virginia Law Review and received the Stephen Pierre Traynor Award for best oral advocate in the finals of the William Minor Lile Moot Court Competition.

On April 18, the Ninth Circuit issued its opinion in hiQ Labs, Inc. v. LinkedIn Corporation[1] in which the court clarified its position on an important topic: whether the common practice of data “web scraping” can create criminal liability under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA). To be clear, the Ninth Circuit was

Stephen Piepgrass and Abbey Thornhill of Troutman Pepper Hamilton Sanders LLP examine the growing movement to give consumers the “right to repair” vehicles themselves alongside the automotive industry’s emerging market for subscription-based features.

In January, President Joe Biden doubled down on his support for the “right to repair” movement, a push to increase consumers’ ability

Last month President Joe Biden made headlines when he reiterated his support for “right-to-repair” rules, which he first announced in a July 2021 executive order (discussed in our previous article here). The executive order asked the Federal Trade Commission (FTC or Commission) to draft “right-to-repair” rules to increase consumers’ ability to repair equipment on

Last month, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC or Commission) published its Statement of Regulatory Priorities (Statement), announcing its regulatory agenda for 2022. The Statement suggests that the agency will focus largely on rulemaking. New rules will seek to advance President Biden’s agenda of promoting competition in the American economy.

Rulemaking Focus

The FTC “is an

On December 8, Instagram CEO Adam Mosseri appeared before the Senate Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product Safety, and Data Security to answer questions about the social media platform’s effects on children and teens. His appearance followed an announcement by a bipartisan coalition of state attorneys general (AGs) regarding an investigation into whether Instagram promoted its

On October 12, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral argument in the case Cameron v. EMW Women’s Surgical Center, P.S.C., an appeal from the Sixth Circuit. Plaintiff abortion providers (collectively, “EMW”) initiated this case, seeking to challenge the constitutionality of a controversial Kentucky law, H.B. 454. The law prohibits the “dilation and evacuation” abortion