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David Anthony handles litigation against consumer financial services businesses and other highly regulated companies across the United States. He is a strategic thinker who balances his extensive litigation experience with practical business advice to solve companies’ hardest problems.

On October 17, following Washington Attorney General (AG) Bob Ferguson’s unsuccessful consumer protection action against thrift store chain, Savers Value Village Inc. (Savers), the Washington Superior Court of King County granted Savers’ motion for attorney’s fees and costs in the amount of $4.3 million. This substantial award — which is allowable under the Washington Consumer Protection Act (WA CPA) — represents a substantial recoupment of Savers’ attorneys’ fees spent to defend the almost decade-long litigation.

Continue Reading Washington AG Ordered to Pay $4.3M in Attorney’s Fees and Costs to Thrift Store Chain

On June 7, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced a request for information (RFI) to gain additional insight into how it can optimize joint enforcement with state attorneys general (state AGs) to protect consumers from fraud. The announcement signals a growing trend of cooperation between the FTC and state AGs, which we have also seen between the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and the state regulators.Continue Reading FTC Comment Request Signals Joint Enforcement With State AGs Will Continue Increasing

In a January 10 ruling, U.S. District Judge Mary Geiger Lewis sided with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), finding that they may continue in their fight to show that the South Carolina state court system’s restriction on automated “scraping” of eviction-related case information violates their First Amendment right to access and record public court records. “Scraping,” an automated data collection technique, is currently prohibited by the terms of use of the state Public Index, and attorneys who violate these terms can face disciplinary action. South Carolina Court Administration also uses technical means to prevent scraping. The NAACP has argued there is no reason for the outright ban, and other court systems allow the practice without any adverse consequences.Continue Reading South Carolina Judge Rules NAACP Public Records Scraping Case May Proceed

On January 13, a coalition of 39 state attorneys general — led by AGs from Pennsylvania, Washington, Illinois, Massachusetts, and California — reached a settlement with student loan servicer Navient over allegedly unfair, deceptive, and abusive student loan origination and servicing practices. The $1.8 billion settlement will undoubtedly draw eyes, but perhaps just as important

On July 1, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB or Bureau) released a FCRA Tenant Screening Enforcement Compliance Bulletin, outlining its enforcement focus areas as the country transitions to a post-pandemic rental market. The Bureau states that it “intends to look carefully at the accuracy and dispute-handling practices of [consumer reporting agencies “CRAs”] that

A federal court in Michigan recently ruled that out-of-state residents have standing to sue under the Michigan Personal Privacy Protection Act (PPPA). In Lin v. Crain Communications, Inc., Case No. 2:19-cv-11889 (E.D. Mich., June 25, 2019), Gary Lin, a Virginia resident, filed a putative class-action lawsuit against Crain Communications, Inc. (Crain), a Michigan-based publishing

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and SettleIt, Inc., an online debt-settlement company, have agreed to settle “abusiveness” claims for $1.4 million.

In an April 13 complaint filed in a California federal court, the CFPB detailed SettleIt’s business practices and alleged SettleIt concealed information from its customers. SettleIt negotiates with creditors to reduce and settle

On March 31, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB or Bureau) announced it is rescinding its April 1, 2020 policy statement regarding the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) and Regulation V following the enactment of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act). This recission is effective April 1.

Background

On March 27,

On March 24, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) provided the Consumer Response 2020 Annual Report (CFPB Report) to Congress. The CFPB Report reflects complaints submitted by consumers to the CFPB and analyzes those complaints.

In 2020, the CFPB saw a 54% rise in complaints from 2019 — with the total number increasing from 352,400

We have long predicted that just as other states followed California in passing breach notification laws, states would follow in California’s footsteps in regulating information privacy practices with the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA), which was later amended by the California Privacy Rights Act of 2020 (CPRA).[1] The Virginia state legislature recently