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Stefanie takes a holistic approach to working with clients both through compliance counseling and assessment relating to consumer products and services, as well as serving as a zealous advocate in government inquiries, investigations, and consumer litigation.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently amended requirements concerning artificial or prerecorded voice calls, effective July 20.[1] See Proposed 47 C.F.R. § 64.1200. Notably, the FCC amended requirements concerning prerecorded noncommercial and nontelemarketing commercial calls by (1) placing a cap on the number of calls to up to three calls within a consecutive 30-day period, unless the caller has obtained prior express consent, and (2) requiring callers to provide specific opt-out mechanisms.Continue Reading New FCC Requirements for Prerecorded Voice Calls Effective July 20: Is Your Company Prepared to Comply?

Indiana Attorney General Todd Rokita and the Indiana Department of Financial Institutions announced a settlement in excess of $250,000 with Integrity Acceptance Corp., affiliated companies, and their owners to resolve allegations that they originated personal loans without the required license, contracted for charges in excess of the maximum allowable rate, misrepresented finance charges, and failed to disclose prepaid finance charges in violation of the Indiana Uniform Consumer Credit Code and Indiana Deceptive Consumer Sales Act. As part of the settlement, the entities will forgive $223,685 in loans, pay $33,991 in restitution, and pay $33,000 in civil penalties and costs to the state. The entities and their owners are also enjoined from engaging in similar conduct in the future.Continue Reading Indiana AG Settles with Company over Allegedly Providing Unfair and Deceptive Personal Loans to Finance Auto Purchases

Yesterday, 14 Republican attorneys general (AGs) filed an amicus brief in support of a lawsuit brought by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and other co-plaintiffs against the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB or the Bureau), alleging that the Bureau exceeded its statutory authority by amending its examination manual to include discrimination, and in particular disparate

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) recently issued a report, focused on the current student loan servicing market that laid out the results of several supervisory efforts related to student lending. Higher education lenders and loan servicers should pay close attention to the report’s findings, which signal the CFPB’s interest in enforcing the Consumer

In March 2022, state attorneys general provided comments to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) concerning the CFPB’s inquiry into companies that offer consumers the opportunity to divide the cost of their purchases into multiple installments, also referred to as “buy now, pay later” (BNPL) products. In response, the CFPB issued a report in September

In a keynote address at the Consumer Federation of America’s 2022 Consumer Assembly, CFPB Deputy Director Zixta Martinez squarely took aim at “rent-a-bank schemes” in some of the first (if not the first) such comments by a senior CFPB official. Historically, the CFPB has confined itself to “true lender” litigation against participants in high-rate

On May 19, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB or Bureau) issued an interpretive rule, describing states’ authorities to pursue companies and individuals that allegedly violate any of the federal consumer financial laws enforced by the CFPB.

CFPB Director Rohit Chopra described this action as “promoting state enforcement, not suffocating it.” It openly invites

On May 4, the Connecticut Banking Commissioner issued a temporary order to cease and desist and order to make restitution against lead generator SoLo Funds Inc. (SoLo) for allegedly engaging in unfair, deceptive, and abusive acts and practices (UDAAPs) in violation of the Consumer Financial Protection Act of 2010, as well as for operating in